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20121112
20121112
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cut spending and we did, we cut $900 billion in spending that he can't like painful tos us. >> we'll continue our call to rise bol politics and make a deal. oufr guests this morning include mike jackson and also david zaslav. and the head of maris group. and douglas holtz-eakin. >> let's talk about eurozone finance ministers meeting to discuss whether to release a new tranche of fund to go greece. the leaders are not expected it to okay the funding despite greece approving a tough 2013 budget. we'll have more from ross westgate in london on all of that. japan's economy shrank, first contraction since last year. the data adding to signs of slowing global growth and tensions with china nudging the which i into recession. and yen minute's main oil export pipeline shut after it was blown up in two pieces. local news organizations didn't identify the attackers, but they've been repeatedly sabotaged. finally, iran launched a military drill across half of the country today. government warning it would act again against aggressors. >> where is your jacket? >> i decided in high spirit of r
. yes, volatility will be with us for a period of time. but we are very constructive when we look at next year on the whole. >> chris, where's the -- >> what are you seeing today? a fractional move now but it's been very much getting rid of winners and selling into any strength in this market ever since the election. >> well, i guess the question i have for chris, where is the volatility? i'm surprised. the vix has collapsed. it's a rare day when you see the vix down 9%. the stock market, dow is only up 18 points? >> this day has a big asterisk attached to it, don't you think? >> yes, but nonetheless when you saw the stuff over the week we understand a lot of people -- i was surprised how many people were arguing maybe it's not a bad thing to go over the fiscal cliff. i think it's a terrible idea. i'm surprised to see the vix down so much. we have options expiration coming up friday. people are taking off when the risk is rising. i find that a little odd. >> michael, your idea is it's not just about the fiscal cliff. apple is a big factor for this market as well, isn't it? >> no q
say the central bank likely to hold off until after the federal reserve is due to meet. joining us for more is global chief officer of global equities. and head of japanese research at jpmorgan securities. i suppose the question is whether this contraction here in the third quarter will be followed by another one in the fourth. >> it looks quite likely. you've got bad news on exports continuing and you've got on on top of that now a contraction in public spending beginning to come through. the boost we got after the weak construction from the disaster, that's now bapeaking out. so public demand and economic demand likely to drag us. >> and how much is domestic relying on government support? >> the domestic private side is actually doing really differencely okay. one data point here, you find that mortgage lending is actually growing now for six or seven consecutive months and that shows you that they're opening their purse spritrings little bit. but overall you're really looking at slight contraction in the economy. >> what extra pressure does this put on the government and the ban
we have been hoping for for four decades now will arrive and the u.s. will serve up more oil than saudi arabia in the year 2020. that according to a new report by people who actually do know the oil business very well. >>> and sex and the ceo. and the collateral damage. how widespread is sex at work? we really want the answer to that question? >>> what should the consequences be. >>> and no hockey. forget about that. no problem. look what the world of auto racing brought us over the weekend. a brawl! another black eye for a sport that corporate america was counting on? no fighting here at cnbc. sue's with me here again. nice to have you here, sue. >> it is great to be here, ty. those "fast money" guys got me all riled up over there. they're having a good time. >>> we're going to take a look at the markets right now. dow jones industrial average has turned into positive territory, not by too much, but hey if you're a bull, we'll take it. the s&p is up two. the nasdaq up almost eight on the trading session. >>> we here at cnbc, as you do, follow the energy sector very closely on "po
thursday, and figures were mixed thursday. the possibility of a u.s. downgrade if america goes over the so-called fiscal cliff. but said it would wait until after budget negotiations. a downgrade, of course, would make it more expensive for the united states to borrow money. >>> superstorm sandy could provide an economic boost to the auto industry. as many as 250,000 new and used cars may have been ruined by sandy. a loss that could eventually lead to a spike in auto sales. >>> overall consumer borrowing expanded in the month of september, but at a slower pace than the previous month. a sign buyers may be pulling back on their credit card purchases. this is an important data point, because consumers and consumer spending make up more than two-thirds of the u.s. economy. >>> what will a second term for president obama mean to the economy? will we see compromise? or will we fall over the fiscal cliff? joining me now, two former top presidential advisers. laura tiesson, chair of economic advisers for clinton and marty feld stein under president reagan. thanks so much for spending the time tod
hd hasn't rolled out in turkey and russia. it's a big hedge for us. >> thank you for being here. >> appreciate it very much. join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee with carl quintanilla, david faber and jim cramer. we kick off the week better than we had seen last week. looking at a higher open across the board after the worse weekly losses with both indices closing below the 200-day moving average on friday. looking at the action over in europe, we are seeing small gains across the board. our road map starts on capitol hill where congress returns to work tomorrow as leaders prepare to meet with the president this week on the fiscal cliff. lawmakers over the weekend sound optimistic that a deal will be reached. how likely is that? >> jeffries gets bought in a $3.7 billion deal. leucadia is described as a mini berkshire hathaway. >> a war to see who will open earliest on black friday or on thanksgiving itself as it turns out. >> first up, after coming off the worst week for the markets
hands? let's get to our panel, david dahl, mark travis, and robert zagunis will join us in a moment. good to have you on the program. david, let me begin with you. how are you invested right now amidst all of these issues pertaining to the fiscal cliff, higher tax rates in 2013, et cetera? >> always good to be back with you. we've been defensive. we've looked for opportunities to take gains over the course of the year. thankfully we've been very u.s.-centric in our investments over the course of 2011-2012. what we're preparing for now is looking again at the foreign markets in 2013. >> foreign markets meaning you want to be allocating money outside of the u.s. because of these issues in the u.s.? >> well, taking a look at some of the large global players here in the u.s. and outside, because as tax rates go up here in the united states, what we're about to see is probably the laugher curve in reverse. tax rates going up, revenues declining, creating a headwind for gdp. we're look at companies in the world for looking for global growth opportunity outside our borders. >> mark, let me
to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm leslie stahl. by most accounts, the financial crash of 2008 pushed the u.s. economy to the brink of collapse. in its aftermath, some of the country's biggest banks received very big bailouts while large numbers of small local banks failed. this edition features a unique inside look at the seizure of a failed bank and a rare interview with one of the men at the center of the 2008 economic crisis and the recovery plan that has followed, the chairman of the board of governors of the federal reserve system, ben bernanke. plus, morley safer asks, "can america afford the lincoln penny?" well, we begin with bernanke. after the crash of '08, bernanke invoked emergency powers, and with unprecedented aggressiveness, he's thrown more than $1 trillion at the crisis. the words of any fed chairman cause fortunes to rise and fall, and so by tradition, chairmen of the fed do not do interviews. that is, until march of 2009 when ben bernanke sat down with scott pelley. >> mr. chairman, i'm gonna start with a question that everyone wants me to ask. when does this end? >> it de
all session. dow closing flat. nasdaq down slightly. but that doesn't stop us from looking for ideas on "mad money." yes, we have an entirely man made crisis. one that could not only cause a huge firings and curtail retail spending dramatically, but it's also driving people out of a stock market where individual companies are giving you positives that would normally provide a tremendous backdrop to a higher market. you know there was a time when some good news over multiple sectors would produce a bountiful bull. yes, good enough things occurred with individual companies that the sum total would produce overall gains in many stocks. we used to call this pin action. now we get nothing. no spillover. the 1 pin gets knocked down. and nothing else falls with it. let me just go over some of the good news, some of the nabbing down 1 pins just today that are being obscured by this darn cliff walk. let me show you what you might have missed and will continue to miss until president obama convenes all the leaders of congress and sends them to camp david to hammer out an agreement in time for
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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